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CANDIDATE

Can You Get Elected To Congress?

Version 0.3.2

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Choose your party

The Democratic Party is the oldest of the two major parties having formed in 1792 from what remained of Thomas Jefferson's Anti-Federalist Party.

Today, the party's general move toward Republicans on important economic issues in an effort to seek compromise continues to anger both the progressive and labor base.

Key Voter Groups

Blue Collar Bloc


New Coalition Democrats


Postmoderns


Progressives

Democratic Party

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Select Primary Issue

New New Deal


Climate Action


Ban Assault Weapons


More, Open Borders


Green Energy


Right to Choose


Universal Health Care


Marriage Equality


Worker Rights


The Republican Party was formed in 1854 as an anti-slavery party with a slogan that best captures the spirit of the party through the decades: "free labor, free land, free men."

Today, the party is questioning its identity and determining what direction to take in the future as the demographics game gives advantage to the Democrats.

Key Voter Groups

Dissaffected


Libertarian


Main Street Conservative


Tea Party

Republican Party

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Select Primary Issue

Austerity


Climate Denial


Gun Rights


Stricter Controls


Drill, Baby, Drill


Fetal Rights


Repeal Obamacare


Traditional Marriage


Right to Work


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Issue Stances

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Voter Support
Expected Turnout

June - Week 1

JUNE 2014

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VICTORY!!!!!

Congrats! You've won the election! Now it's time to prepare for your new life as a politician. Will you uphold your promises you made during the campaign? How will you negotiate the needs of your constituents with the promises you made to any lobbyists you took money from? Will you vote on party lines, or be an independent? Time will tell.

Your Votes:


Opponent Votes:


turnout

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Strongest Voter Group

DEFEAT!!!!!

Aww. We lost! For all our efforts, we failed to garner enough votes. Maybe it was an issue of turnout? Maybe we didn't have the support of key voter groups who turned out in the election? Maybe we just suck? Either way, it's back to the real world for us, but hey, you didn't really want to be in Congress. I mean, they have like a 13% approval rating right now anyway...

Your Votes:


Opponent Votes:


turnout

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Strongest Voter Group

Favored Issue Stances

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Credits

Game Design/Development: John C. Osborn

Lead Artist: John T. Carter

Lead Sound Engineer: Tyberius H. Guenley



Special Thanks:

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Point of the Game

The goal of The Candidate is to get elected to Congress! You've just won your party's primary, and now the time has come to woo the general electorate. In order to do this, you must raise money, pick issues to gain Approval from different Voter Groups, and try to increase the Turnout of Voter Groups that support you to ensure victory.



In order to do this, you will select Challenges in the game that allow you to make decisions on different aspects of your campaign. But be wary, if you make the wrong choices at the wrong time, you will lose opportunities.

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Resources

In The Candidate, there are several Resources you must consider as you engage on your journey to Congress. In the game screen, you can move your mouse over the many icons to learn what they represent. Below is a brief explanation of the major resources:



Money: The backbone to any campaign. You need money to run political ads supporting your candidacy or smearing your opponent, to engage in other forms of communication like mailers, and to do other super fun things in your campaign. Run low, and you'll find yourself hurting.


Approval: This represents how all eight Voter Groups feel about you. Green is good. Gray is undecided. Red is bad.


Turnout: In the voter turnout area on the bottom right of the game screen, you can see the likelihood of how each Voter Group will turnout on Election Day. Green means supporting you, red means against you. You don't want the latter.


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Issue Stances

In The Candidate, there are 10 major issues you can take a stance on. Scrolling your mouse over the icon in-game will reveal what the issue is. The stance you take will affect how certain Voter Groups view you as a candidate. In general, there is one stance that is a strong liberal stance, one that is strongly conservative, and one that is more in the political center. While taking strong stances will rally your base, taking more centrist stances will potentially rally independent voters. More on that next.

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Voter Groups

The strategy behind The Candidate is figuring out how to negotiate the interests of the eight major Voter Groups in the game. All these groups are derived from the Pew Research Center for the People and Press 2011 Political Typology report. Each group has different priorities and allegiances. To get more detailed info about each, you can either click on the Voter Group option on the main screen, or click on their icon in-game.


Blue Collar Bloc: Diehard Democrat. Socially moderate, fiscally moderate

Disaffected: Leaning Republican. Socially conservative, fiscally moderate

Libertarian: Leaning Republican. Socially liberal, fiscally conservative

Main Street Conservatives: Diehard Republican. Socially conservative, fiscally conservative

New Coalition Democrats:Leaning Democrat. Socially conservative, fiscally liberal

Postmoderns: Leaning Democrat. Socially liberal, fiscally moderate

Progressives: Diehard Democrat. Socially liberal, fiscally liberal

Tea Party: Diehard Republican. Socially conservative, fiscally conservative

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Challenges

You make your decisions in The Candidate by picking Challenges. There are six different kinds of Challenges that allow you to focus on different tactics in the game. The game starts in June and ends in November. Each month, you can pick four of the Challenges present on the screen; in November, you can pick two. That's 22 turns total!

Candidate Challenges are random challenges that affect the candidate.


Voter Group Challenges allow you to address the concerns of a random voter group.


Fundraising Challenges allow for opportunities to raise money.


Issues Challenges force you to take a stance on a random issue.


Media Challenges help increase voter turnout.


Operative Challenges allow for more controversial tactics, like robocalling.


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